Blogs from the Sea – Rio to Cape Town – Sailing the South Atlantic

 

One week into leg 2, realised by the fact I am once again a mother down below on galley and cleaning duties, rather than having any notion of the date or day of the week as the days and nights still seem to roll into one, and an afternoon lull between lunch and supper preparations provide a suitable space for some reflection on the race so far.

Life onboard EIC is notably more serene and markedly more comfortable as cooler climes warrant a cosy and restful sleep and the novelty of getting into one’s sleeping bag to keep the chill at bay are still a welcome treat compared to the stifling temperatures of leg 1.  Everyone seems to be muscling along more calmly and now all the crew have re-found their sea legs and fought off any lingering lurgy, we are back to full strength.

Despite the power of the purple magnet finding any unexplainable wind hole in the South Atlantic and our early lead faltering to a familiar 8th, morale is still high, driven by a positivity and good cheer that has been a running and welcome continuum  for this leg.  Newly installed targets for mileage and speed each watch keep us focused and engaged and the regular appearance of the stop watch on deck to time our sail change evolutions have been successful in keeping the tempo up and ensuing an ongoing sense of achievement, despite the frustrations of regularly not having as much wind as the gribs portray.

In spite of the disappointment of not reaching the scoring gate amongst the top three to secure some extra points, attentions have turned to utilising the wind we have and pushing on to Cape Town.  We have the kite back up and a steady breeze and are delighted to be progressing once more.  As we helm and trim as best we can to try and climb back up the ladder, determined to regain our lost ground, there is still every notion of enjoyment in the variety of weather conditions, great big South Atlantic rollers across the beam and the company of a beautiful unnamed sea bird with Apache style markings on its wings, all of which keep this leg interesting.

About the Author:

Leave A Comment